Friday, October 2, 2015

Book Write-Up: The Argument-Free Marriage, by Fawn Weaver

Fawn Weaver.  The Argument-Free Marriage: 28 Days to Creating the Marriage You’ve Always Wanted with the Spouse You Already Have.  Nashville: Nelson Books, 2015.  See here to buy the book.

Fawn Weaver and her husband, Keith, have an argument-free marriage.  That does not mean that they never disagree or articulate their disagreements, nor does it mean that they never hurt one another’s feelings.  Rather, it means that they do not acrimoniously attack each other.  They try to focus on attacking problems together rather than attacking each other.  They attempt to resolve their conflicts in a constructive, tactful, yet honest manner.

I myself am not married, but I decided to read this book because I thought that it might help me in social interaction, with which I struggle.  At first, Fawn seemed to me to be bragging about her marriage, her accomplishments, and her life.  When she talked about her own struggles, however, I appreciated what she had to say.

Many people may conclude that what Fawn is saying is common sense.  Those who have read a lot of books about how to have a happy marriage may think that Fawn contributes nothing new.  Some have even noted that she and Keith have no children, so they do not understand the conflict that couples with children experience.

A lot of what Fawn has to say is common sense: focus on the good in your spouse, express your hurt feelings after you have cooled down a bit, and spend within your means.  On some of the things that Fawn said, you have to decide for yourself whether or not to follow it.  She says that people should take a day of rest, which is reasonable but may not be feasible for everyone.  She supports tithing and contends that everyone she knows who tithes does well financially.  You have to decide for yourself whether or not to take that leap of faith.

Whether or not Fawn says anything new, I did find her book to be a delightful read.  You get Fawn’s story, quirks, and personality in this book.  Moreover, her writing style is engaging: it is simple, but not dumbed-down.  It is like listening to a friend.  Fawn also responds to her critics who portray her as a June Cleaver type.  Fawn dispels that impression, while also offering a presentation of marriage that I would consider both Christian and feminist.

I received a complimentary review copy of this book through BookLook Bloggers, in exchange for an honest review.

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