Friday, June 8, 2018

Movie Write-Up (Loosely-Speaking): Solo

We went to see Solo during the Memorial Day Weekend.  My custom has been to write about all of the Star Wars movies that I see in the theater.  I’ve been stalling on this one.  For the others, there were profound elements that I felt I could blog about.  For Solo, there is nothing like that.  And yet, Solo was my favorite of the newly-released Star Wars movies.  I mean, above The Force Awakens, Rogue One, and The Last Jedi.

What did I like about Solo?  That’s a good question.  The plot was fairly easy to follow.  Rogue One, I thought, was more convoluted.  The characters in Solo were better.  I found them more likable.  The Han character: well, I cannot say that he was totally like Harrison Ford, but he was cool and confident, in his own way.  His girlfriend Qi’ra: she was physically attractive, certainly, but she was also a power-broker, carrying herself with authority wherever she went.  Lando: a cheat, yet a charming cheat.  But he loved his robot, who crusaded for robot rights. He probably did not love her in a romantic sense, as she thought, but he cared for her.  It was funny when Lando narrated the Carlissian Chronicles, and when he flew the Millennium Falcon away when Han was in trouble (poor Han)!  The Woody Harrelson character: mistrustful, yet he loved someone on his team.  Then there was another character on his team who loved to be alone and unattached, or so he thought.

Then there were the cool scenes.  Some spoilers here.  We learn how Han gets the name “Solo.”  That scene was pretty intense, as he was trying to escape Imperial detection.  Han is thrown into a pit with a hungry monster, and the monster turns out to be….Aaaarrhlll!  Is that how you spell the sounds he makes?  Lando says that he hopes he will never see Han again, and Han takes that in stride.  Han at the end is about to work for a gangster on Tatooine, who the Woody Harrelson character was about to work for.  The criminal powerhouse who was ultimately in charge of Qi’ra and her husband turned out to be…Darth Maul!

In the end, Han helps out people we thought were bandits but turned out to be the precursors of the Rebellion.  One of them is the actor who played Wicket in Return of the Jedi!  Han declines to join the Rebellion, preferring instead to smuggle.  I wondered if this Han was a bit more idealistic than the crusty Harrison Ford one.  Or maybe Han’s natural character is to look out for number one, and yet to end up doing the right thing, every now and then.

There were a lot of kids watching the movie.  Is it good for them to watch a movie in which the hero is a thief and a smuggler?  I don’t want to be prudish here, but it’s something I wonder.

Anyway, I’ll leave the comments open, but snarky comments about my post will not be published.

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